Make a Beeswax Luminary

Happy Valentine’s Day my beautiful friends! I hope your day if filled with love and happiness and special kisses.

This morning, Kitty and Teddy went off to school, each with a basket of valentines for their classmates. Kitty had made little heart shaped mice for each of her friends. Teddy… his Valentine’s will be receiving colorful paper planes! They have all been tested and they fly magnificently!

For my Valentine, my beautiful Good Man, the children and I made a golden beeswax luminary… he is the light in our lives, our protector who keeps us warm with his love and we thought it fitting to make golden magic glowing light for him in return. Isn’t it lovely!

We work with beeswax often and have a small croc-pot that I found at a garage sale for a couple of dollars that I use for melting wax. It’s wonderfully easy for me… I plug it in and in half an hour, the wax is melted and ready for crafting. If you don’t craft with beeswax often, making a simple bain-marie works just as well. Here’s a link to a previous post I wrote about how to make a bain-marie using a cooking pot, a glass jar and boiling water… easy, simple and cheap… here is the link : Make a Simple Bain-marie for Melting Wax. Wax can be bought on Etsy.com.

There are several methods for making a beeswax vessel… we used the bottle-wrapped-in-clingfilm method. We wrapped the bottom of a bottle in plastic film.

Dip the bottom of the bottle into the melted beeswax. Have a bowl of water on hand to dip the bottle into, between wax dippings. This allows the wax to cool sufficiently so that the previous layer isn’t melted by the next dipping. Dip quickly for each layer of wax… if you leave your bottle in the hot wax for too long, the previous layer of wax on your bottle will melt away.

 

After a few layers of wax, we stuck a few watercolor hearts into the hot wax and re-dipped our bottle to seal the hearts into our wax bowl.

 

We were careful to try to dip to the same level every dipping… we wanted the top of our bowl to be as thick as the rest of it.

Into the beeswax… into the water… into the beeswax… into the water.

When our beeswax bowl was as thick as we wanted it, we let it stand to cool. When it was almost set, we loosened the plastic clingfilm from the sides of the bottle. Ever so gently we pulled on the clingfilm, loosening it from the glass. With a little gentle force, we slipped the bottle free. If you have trouble separating the beeswax bowl from the bottle, fill the bottle with hot water and you should be able to slip the bowl off more easily.

Carefully extricate the clingfilm from the inside of your luminary.

We love the rough edges of our luminary… we think the whispy-ness gives it a wonderfully handmade character. But, if you are after a neater look, use scissors to cut the edge straight and round the wax between your warm finger and thumb.

We couldn’t wait until today and gave it to our Valentine a day early. What a LOVE-filled dinner we had last night, with our  luminary shining it’s warm golden glowing light on us all.

May warm golden glowing light shine on you too.

Blessings and magic,

Donni

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Comments

  1. Such a lovely result! Thanks for the tip, it will be easier to work with a bottle for the little ones than a balloon.

  2. So funny! I was just thinking about wanting to learn how to make beeswax candles today. I’m going to try to organize a beeswax making party in LB. :)

  3. Delightful and a lovely tutorial on how to do it too. Can you re-use any left over melted beeswax on other projects?

  4. Oh how beautiful! I love it!

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